Copied!

Grab news, use news

  • Has photos (0 photos)
  • Has videos (0 videos)
  • Has audio (0 audio)

£7000 in a lifetime to hide a bad night’s sleep

Tagged in: | | | | |

The average adult can expect to shell out more than £7,000 in their lifetime – to get them through the day following a rough night’s sleep. Researchers who polled 2,000 adults found women reach for extra make-up or anti-ageing creams to cover up tied eyes and lattes to keep them going.

While men are likely to opt for strong coffee, sunglasses and energy drinks to get them through.

The study also found on average, Brits think they look three years older than their age following a night of poor sleep.

The research, commissioned by Febreze Sleep Serenity also discovered almost two thirds of respondents have endured comments about how tired they look the morning after a bad night’s sleep.

Spokeswoman Anastasia Roumelioti said:

“The research highlights that people care about their looks after a restless night and spend money to compensate for the lack of ‘beauty sleep.”

The study also found puffy eyes (42%) were a common complaint; while a third of people (32%) said looking pale was a tell-tale sign of a bad night’s sleep.

Applying make-up was found to be the most popular way of tackling signs of tiredness, with almost half of respondents (46%) admitting to this.

And it’s not just women, amazingly 5% of men admitted to applying make-up to cover the signs of a bad night’s sleep.

Drinking coffee (34%) and applying eye creams (18%) are also popular ways to disguise that tired feeling, with Brits spending an average of three days per year trying to cover up their lack of sleep.

Playing loud or lively music, exercising and eating comfort foods are also among the top ten.

The research also found on average, Brits struggle to nod off on three nights each week, and lose out on five hours and 26 minutes of shut-eye each week.

Top reasons for disturbed sleep:

1. Needing to go to the toilet
2. Stress/anxiety
3. Being too hot
4. Bad dreams
5. Partner’s snoring