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Summer productivity dip

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Brits say they are less productive during the summer months, research revealed yesterday, with a quarter saying they only give 100 per cent for one day out of the whole week.

In a survey of 2,000 employees nearly all those asked said that the hot weather was a key factor when it came to getting distracted at work with it impacting people’s health and attention span, making them more likely to leave work on time or sneak off early.

Monday afternoons were the time when staff were most likely to have their heads down and be getting on with the job whereas Friday afternoons were unsurprisingly the point at which most staff were distracted.

The research was commissioned by Prevalin Allergy who surveyed 2,000 employees about their work habits.

Don Jayasinghe, senior brand manager for Prevalin Allergy said: “The British summertime is traditionally over in a short space of time therefore it’s not surprising that most workers take longer lunch hours and escape from work early. Everyone wants to make the most of the warm sunny days and the long summer nights.”

Hay fever was one of the key causes of this with most sufferers saying it meant their productivity suffered.

“Everyone can be a bit slow to get started at work some days but for hay fever sufferers it can be really tough, particularly during the summer months”, added Don Jayasinghe.

Less than ten per cent said they always give it their all at work.

Instead of working employees confessed they were most likely to be gossiping with colleagues and friends, day dreaming, surfing the web or running errands from their desk.

Women were most likely to feel guilty when they slack off and they were twice as likely to spend their work hours gossiping and talking with colleagues as well as more likely to make personal calls.

Men were unlikely to feel bad about not pulling their weight justifying their behaviour by saying they felt they were being underpaid.

Many employees said they felt they were unproductive at work blaming tiredness, stress and a lower than desired salary.

Two thirds say they plod through their day and nearly a third of those surveyed said they actively do the bare minimum at work.

Nearly half of those polled said they struggled to get their work done when suffering from hay fever and took an average of six days off a year as a result.

A spokesperson from Prevalin said: “Symptoms like itchy and teary eyes and runny, blocked noses mean that many say they feel they are unable to work at full capacity or enjoy the sunshine. If you don’t suffer from hay fever it can be difficult to understand just how debilitating hay fever symptoms can be.

“Sufferers should seek out treatment at the first sign of their symptoms to help minimise their impact.”



The British summertime is traditionally over in a short space of time therefore it’s not surprising that most workers take longer lunch hours and escape from work early. Everyone wants to make the most of the warm sunny days and the long summer nights

Don Jayasinghe, senior brand manager for Prevalin Allergy



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